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3 edition of Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees found in the catalog.

Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees

Neil I. Lamson

Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees

by Neil I. Lamson

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Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station in Upper Darby, Pa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 4.

Statementby Neil I. Lamson.
SeriesResearch note NE -- 229., Research note NE -- 229.
ContributionsNortheastern Forest Experiment Station (Radnor, Pa.), United States. Forest Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination4 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17817682M
OCLC/WorldCa3782975

APPALACHIAN HARDWOOD STUMP SPROUTS ARE POTENTIAL SAWLOG CROP TREES by NEIL I. LAMSON Research Forester USDA Forest Service Northeas tern Forest Experiment Station Timber and Watershed Laboratory Parsons, W. Va. Abstract.-A survey of 8- and year-old hardwood stump sprouts was made in north-central West Virginia.   Kramer, Paul J. and Kozlowski, Theodore T. Physiology of Trees. McGraw-Hill Book Company New York pgs. Lamson, Neil I. Appalachian Hardwood Stump Sprouts Are Potential Sawlog Crop Trees. USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Research Note NE, 4p.

Describes a study of coppice growth from 6-in stumps of Prunus serotina, Acer rubrum, A. saccharum, Quercus prinus, Q. rubra, Q. alba and Liriodendron tulipifera on two sites in W. Virginia after clear felling at about 55 years of age in A high % of the dominant coppice shoots had good stem form, and many had excellent height and diameter by:   The limited success of methods to naturally regenerate northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) has increased the use of artificial techniques to improve overall oak composition. Enrichment plantings are often recommended as a means to supplement species composition within the existing natural reproduction. Previous enrichment efforts have often resulted in low Cited by:

trees and controlling large cull trees left from previous harvests probably provide the greatest opportunities to use herbicides in Appalachian hardwood forests. A wealth of research information indicates that crop tree release is a cost-eff ective way to increase the future value of hardwood stands. Th e. The desirable trees in high-graded hardwood stands represent the real key to the prescription process (Figure 1). Importance is placed on the species present, Figure 1. Desirable trees such as this oak are necessary for continued management of high-graded stands. Figure 2. This low-quality oak is a cull stem, but it could produce desir-.


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Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees by Neil I. Lamson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The abundance and quality of these stump sprouts indicated that many of them can be considered as potential sawlog crop trees Addeddate Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees.

Upper Darby, Pa.: Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees / By Neil I.

Lamson, Pa.) Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (Radnor and United States. Forest Service. Abstract. Bibliography: p. of access: Internet Topics: Hardwoods.

stumps. Stump sprouts in clearcuts can attain a height of about 35 feet in 10 years (WendelLamson ). Crop trees selected in this study aver- aged 34 feet at the time of treatment.

Assuming released crop trees grow about 2 feet per year (Smith and LamsonLamson and Smith ), in 10 years the crop trees will be more than 50 feet by: 5. Lamson, Neil 1. Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees. USDA Forest Service, Research Note NE Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Upper Darby, PA.

4 p. Lull, Howard W. A forest atlas of the Northeast. Stump sprouts are particularly susceptible to injury, slender trees may be broken off, and tops of dominant and codominant trees are often broken. Top damage is often the point of entry for fungi. Although yellow-poplar usually makes remarkable recovery after such storms, repeated damage can result in a growth reduction and loss of quality.

Lamson, N.I. Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees. USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Research Note NE Cited by: 3. Early crop tree release of red maple seedlings and sprouts is feasible in young, even-aged stands.

It should be done when the new stand has crown closure and crown dominance is being expressed. This occurred on 9- to year-old trees in West Virginia (56,57). Models that quantify the probability of stump sprouting P(s) and sprout characteristics for predominant tree species in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA are lacking.

In this study, plots ( ha) were installed across five stands in eastern Tennessee and western North by: Appalachian Hardwood Species Guide Consistently awarded the highest grade and quality rating, Appalachian Hardwoods are the lumber of choice for those who choose the best.

No matter your needs, Appalachian Hardwoods make a. We describe the development of individual-tree models to estimate, before overstory removal, the contribution of common central Appalachian oak species (northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), black oak (Quercus velutina Lam.), chestnut oak (Quercus montana Willd.), and white oak (Quercus alba L.)) to stand stocking in the third decade ( years).

United States. Forest Service: Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees / (Upper Darby, Pa.: Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, ), also by Neil I.

Lamson and Pa.) Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (Radnor (page images at HathiTrust) United States. Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers, Inc., P.O.

BoxHigh Point, NC | Tel. () Assessing Regeneration Potential When I began research in oak regeneration, the notion was well accepted that advance reproduction and stump sprouts were the sources of successful regeneration after harvest cutting. This First Law of Oak Silviculture was based on early work done by Leffleman and Hawley (), Korstian.

and all clumps of sprouts on the plots to a single stem. All thinning treatments increased diameter growth and. yield compared to the control, but at a 5% rate of return, the control treatmentproduced the largestpresent net.

worth. crop trees that are well-adapted to site conditions to minimize the risk of poor performance or even death over several decades. Draw on local experi-Figure 2. Seedling-origin crop trees develop as single-stem trees, while sprout-origin crop trees develop in multiple-stem clumps. For sprout clumps, select the best two trees and release around.

Northeastern Forest Experiment Station (Radnor, Pa.): Appalachian hardwood stump sprouts are potential sawlog crop trees / (Upper Darby, Pa.: Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, ), also by Neil I.

Lamson and United States Forest Service (page images at HathiTrust). The information needed includes (1) condition and sizeclass distribution of overstory trees by species, (2) quantity and condition of understory trees (desired initial and advanced reproduction), (3) kind and amount of competing vegetation and (4) regeneration method, i.e.

from seeds and seedlings, or from stump and root by: #Trees-Maple was included among predictor variables as a surrogate for the density of nearby red maple sprouts based on the observation that >90% of red maple trees in the study region sprout after cutting (Fei and Steiner, ).

(Stump sprouts of other non-oak species were infrequent and not considered as potential model components.). SELECTING CROP TREES The first step in managing young hardwood stands for sawlogs is to select and mark your crop trees. Sawlog crop trees are trees that are grown as an investment for the future.

They are usually species of high value, such as oak, ash, maple, basswood, cherry or yellow birch. However, any species that is well adapted to File Size: KB. Inseven study areas were established in Connecticut to examine the effects of precommercial crop tree release on development of sapling red oaks (Quercus rubra L.) (n = ).Crown class at canopy closure, competition from adjacent trees for growing space and limited resources, and interaction of these factors were major determinants of survival, upper Cited by: products, small saw logs or low-value saw logs.

2. Select stump sprouts as crop trees if they meet all the previous crop tree criteria and originate at or below groundline. Select only one or two crop trees per clump and cut all remaining sprouts.

Two crop trees can be retained on the same stump only when widely spaced with a U-shaped.In Appalachian mixed hardwood stands, 20 to 40 ft 2 per acre is a typical target for deferred overwood (Miller et al.

a). Residual trees are typically selected so they are spatially well distributed across the stand in deferment systems (Miller et al. ). For different spatial arrangements of reserved trees, see the reserves section.